Two Critical Steps for Success with BPM

Scott Francis
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123What’s the most critical step in producing a successful BPM program? 

If we consider BPM broadly, and not just the IT project, there are two critical steps that are often overlooked. 

First, one of the most overlooked steps is getting your BPM initiative into production. How much more critical can it get than that?  How many consultant recommendations and Power Points are laying around collecting dust, how many projects fail because the sponsors haven’t pulled together the right team and conditions for success?

As we’ve grown BP3, I’ve had the opportunity to interview to lots of consultants with lots of projects on their resume, but i always want to know one thing: how are you taking your projects to production? how are you maintaining those projects after they go live?  How they take them live and maintain them in production is where the rubber meets the road.  That’s the outcome we care about for our customers.

It is the difference between “done” as in “works on my machine” and “done done” as in works for the whole company and creates value.

And that’s what you get with our BP3 team: done done.  We get it working. In production. For your company. And if we don’t have it right, we keep working it until we get it right.

The second overlooked success factor: Investing money in the bad team that is failing.  How often have we all seen budget siphoned from a team that is succeeding and creating value, in order to prop up the budget of a team that is failing and sucking value out of the organization?   it isn’t helping you invest in the good team that is winning and creating value. I don’t see companies do this very often, but they probably should starve the teams that aren’t performing and put more resources behind the ones that ARE performing (often/usually, companies do the opposite… ironic!). 

What you typically see is a bit like Ayn Rand’s Atlas Shrugged –  the successful teams get cut or downsized because they’re “too expensive” and replaced by larger, “less expensive” teams that don’t deliver… see our previous post on the subject of outsourced offshoring. Or the great teams get enveloped and surrounded by a layer of less expensive but ineffective teams that erode the differentiation of that great team. 

Build great teams. Let them do their thing.  Fund them even more when they’re successful!