Predictions for BPM in 2016

Scott Francis
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I’m not big on making predictions for BPM, but I’ve given in to the impulse from time to time.  Usually when people are making predictions, at some level they’re talking their own book.  In the sense that I’m bullish on BPM, and we’re in the BPM business, I’m guilty as well.  But this year I’m going to hold my predictions for the same reason.  I’d be talking my own book, but we’re not ready to do that yet.  We’re going to let 2016 play itself out and maybe we’ll be back in the prediction game next year.

Have no fear, however, BPM.com is in the game!  Along with the usual suspects!

I like Nathaniel Palmer’s opening the best:

He was a thought leader with few peers, and out of his work came what has become known as “Amara’s Law” which states that “we overestimate the effect of a technology in the short run and underestimate the effect in the long run.”

This is of course true and visible in any area of technology, including (in fact particularly) with regard to BPM. For years we have claimed that BPM would change the world, and indeed each year it has, even if not quite by the magnitude its most passionate proponents had hoped and claimed. Nonetheless, year over year BPM has advanced. There is a compound effect at play, and as we look back just 5 years ago, nonetheless over the last decade, the impact of BPM has been both indisputably profound, and for most underestimated.

Where not long ago we described BPM in terms of its potential, today it is easy to measure what it has done. The enterprises who have adopted BPM are forever changed for the better. If not all of them, certainly most – this claim is true where it was not always the case. Today the success stories easy to find and impossible to ignore.

There followed quite a few predictions from regular contributors to BPM.com and BPM blogs – but even more so from vendors!

 

 

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