Differentiation

Scott Francis
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“If we consider BPM broadly, and not just the IT project, one of the most overlooked steps is getting into production. How many consultant recommendations and power points are laying around collecting dust (some, maybe for good reason), how many projects fail because the sponsors haven’t pulled together the right team and conditions for success?” – Scott Francis.

This was a comment I made on the BPM.com forum not long ago.  The first and most important measure of success for BPM is to get into production.  If you’re not getting into production you can’t start the real-live-data feedback loop for improving your business.  If you’re not getting into production, you’re not yielding the benefits of the process: customer experience, cost savings, increased revenue, decreased time-to-market.

So when you’re looking at a project and wondering if you can save $10 an hour on a consulting rate, or send the work offshore rather than onshore to save money.  Remember that the hourly rate or incremental savings on the project work isn’t even close to the most important factor for your business. Getting to deployment is the most important thing.  If you could save 10% on your house, but with a 5x greater risk of total failure and having to pay for another house, would you do it?  Of course not. But we see this kind of behavior all the time in IT circles.

Don’t be that penny-wise pound-foolish buyer.  There is real differentiation in the BPM delivery market, and if you’re reading this blog, you know where to go to find the best of the best. We don’t just put the best people in the field, we back them up with the best support and development team in BPM.  And then we back all of them up with great technology and software that we’ve developed.  And the leading BPM methodology.  At BP3, we keep getting better at this, because we’re applying BPM to our own business and delivery.