AQPC Interview: Is Micro-Managing with BPM a Myth?

Scott Francis
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I was invited to be interviewed by the APQC blog the other day, and the results are now live on their site.  Some favorite quotes ensue:

In this quote I was referring to how to ask the right questions to decide if something needs to be included in the process:

However, if you present the list of questions I ask to determine if a detail can’t be removed, almost everyone would say it is the right list of questions to ask – of course it is. But no one can explain why they weren’t asking those questions before.  Sometimes good advice is only obvious in the rear view mirror.

And in this one, happy customers are the topic:

“Is it adding value to our end-customer?” Because our end-customer is #1.  If they’re happy, it will act as deodorant – covering up a lot of other process improvement opportunities and inefficiencies in our processes.  We could have the best process ever, but if we don’t make the customer happier, all that efficiency goes to waste.

And on the people in the process:

Two things: first, a laser focus on ROI can sometimes cause management to be focused on headcount reductions as a result of automation.  But the goal isn’t to get rid of the people that take care of your customers and automate them out of existence.  The goal should be to provide better service and results for customers.

On trust:

If you don’t trust your team, [then] hire people you trust, or invest in the team until you trust them.  Don’t expect software to fix trust issues.

Realizing full potential of BPM:

We’ve worked with several companies who bought a technical solution to an IT problem by buying a BPMS.  But when they worked with us, they discovered BPM had a lot more to offer than just the software implementation.

 

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