Speaking of Aligning with Values (and Customer Value)

Scott Francis
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In a recent post I discussed having a bit of epiphany for our business.  The epiphany wasn’t the “idea” of aligning with creating customer value in innovative ways, it was the realization of a better way to articulate what we were already moving toward. Another interview, this time with USA Today, where I think they captured perfectly how to align with customer value, without saying it:

“That is exactly it,” he says emphatically. “It’s just easier to talk about product attributes that you can measure with a number. Focus on price, screen size, that’s easy. But there’s a more difficult path, and that’s to make better products, ones where maybe you can’t measure their value empirically.

“This is terribly important and at the heart of what we do. We care about how to design the inside of something you’ll never see, because we think it’s the right thing to do.”

 

He didn’t say it, but I will.  It isn’t just the right thing to do for Apple, or for the engineer, or for the designer. It is the right thing to do for the customer, especially the customer who values the caring and effort that goes into building and crafting an iPhone.

By the way, no one says “crafting” when talking about Android phones.  Manufactured maybe, but not crafted.  Less attention to detail, less “caring” going into it.  An example of the results of caring, this photo of a customer entering an Apple store in Germany.

And this quote really captures how I feel about what we’re about to embark on with BP3:

“It feels like each time we are beginning at the beginning, in a really exciting way, and if you could see what I mean it wouldn’t just be rhetoric,” says the man whose sense of aesthetics and taste has helped Apple sell some 700 million iOS devices to date. “It’s very easy to make something that is new, but it won’t be new the day after tomorrow. So we are trying to make things that are better.”

Well, we’re not designing iPhones or other cool gadgets, but we can design great offerings for our customers in our market.

And as for values:

“People come here for the values that are evident in every product we build,” he says. “When we make decisions, it’s not a battle of people trying to break us out of our value system. We all want to double down on these values, whose aim is to make things simpler, more focused. Those are spoken and unspoken mantras in all the discussions we have. You can call that Steve’s legacy, but it’s Apple now.”

People come to BP3 for our values as well.  When I talk to Lombardi alumni who are interested in working with us, it isn’t about the money we’re making, the growth in revenues, the “perks” of the job… every time it is about working with this team, with the values we have for innovating around customers’ value and BPM.  As I’ve told many people over the last 6 years, we think “focusing on BPM” leaves us a plenty big sandbox to play in.

 

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