BPM Could Save Your Life (Revisited) by

We’ve previously discussed how BPM can dramatically improve aggregate outcomes in healthcare.  This isn’t just about cost, but about saving lives:

DR. PATRICIA GABOW, Denver Health and Hospital Authority: What that translated to at Denver Health last year is that 213 people walked out of here alive who would have been expected to die. So, that makes the statistic into a very personal aspect for people who, in fact, lives were saved.

An update to the healthcare and BPM theme is news from The Ottawa Hospital, one of the largest academic teaching hospitals in Ottawa, which rolled out a care management platform that transforms hospital operations:

The Ottawa Hospital engaged IBM to help it create a comprehensive care process management platform with the goal of improving patient flow, safety, quality of patient care, and the overall patient experience. The platform is based on the integration of multiple IBM offerings and includes business process management and operational decision management.

Of course, if we’re to believe ACM advocates, BPM has no place in healthcare.  You can’t possibly have a process around care-giving.  Or can you.  The care management process includes:

  • Closed loop communication ensures in-process communications are properly sent, received, and acted on.  Requests for lab work aren’t just file folders passed around – there are escalations and communication protocols in place.
  • Viewing and maintaining the “circle of care” – all the providers involved in the patient’s care and facilitating communication between them.
  • An activity plan that enables providers to assign tasks and monitor activities
  • Metrics that inform hospital management about process execution, benchmarking, and using that historical data to make informed real-time decisions on current patients.

It is an ambitious solution, involving an iPad app and IBM BPM and ODM.  I love some of the examples given, including this one:

“You can see, for example, that the flow in the emergency department is too fast to be taken up in the admitting units, and you can then influence that.”

A great example of how you can improve aggregate care with BPM, not just “per-patient” care.  Its a good read if you’re looking for the business case for BPM and healthcare.

You’re going to see more cases of this kind of application of process to healthcare in the future.  I love seeing BPM saving lives.