Lowering the Barrier to Mobile BPM by

We’ve blogged before about the benefits of native mobile apps for BPM (and in particular, why a native iOS app is a good place to start).

But one of the things we’ve learned in working with customers is that there’s a concern about the investment required for a native mobile app.  Despite the shortcomings of an HTML-based solution, it does address a few points customers worry about:

  1. Cross-platform is “easier” in a sense – they all support HTML, but they may not support each device “equally” well.
  2. They have HTML, Javascript, and CSS skills, but they may not have objective-C or mobile Java skills…
  3. HTML approaches might customer teams sneak up on a mobile solution without addressing it head-on.

It is the last point that really has attracted our attention of late.  We’ve been building a packaged solution for IBM BPM that let’s you build fantastic user interfaces for the desktop.  But that’s not all.  They’re also responsive UI’s that look great on mobile devices.  We’re trying to reduce the friction between BPM and Mobile BPM.

And to point #2- we’re not delivering to customers something that they can’t maintain, or hire people to maintain.  Because HTML and Javascript and CSS are competencies that are relatively easy to find or hire for.  That’s important for the adoption of new technology into a large organization.

We still think the best mobile experiences will be native applications. But hybrid apps and HTML apps will have their place – and a key value proposition is as follows:

  • lower cost if the HTML app is “free” as a result of really well-designed desktop responsive UI.
  • lower cost to maintain due to accessibility of the skills and techniques
  • the ability to “turn on” mobile when a team is ready, rather than having to spin up a whole mobile initiative first.

If you’re looking to get started with Mobile BPM apps, explore some ideas with the BP3 team and let’s see if we can get you started with less friction.