The WP Engine Model

Scott Francis
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This PandoDaily post from Trevor Gilbert does as good a job as any article I’ve seen so far in describing WPEngine’s secret sauce:

With the goal of becoming the one-stop shop for WordPress needs, the company has been steadily and methodically rolling out features that make WordPress simpler and easier since WP Engine launched in 2010. […]

Automattic’s investment in WP Engine also goes a long way towards showing how popular WP Engine has become in the WordPress community. I spoke with a number of WP Engine customers, and the testimonials aren’t just happy. They’re downright giddy with the service.

[…]

In part, this has to do with WP Engine’s most intangible asset: its support team. For customers of the company, WP Engine provides technical support from WordPress experts only. In addition, the company also leverages the existing WordPress community to help solve problems in forums or on Twitter.

Because of these incremental improvements all geared towards the goal of making developers’ lives easier, WP Engine is poised to tackle a huge market.

With BP Labs, BP3 is borrowing from this playbook:

  1. Making BPM simpler for our customers and their BPM practitioners (not to mention for ourselves), with technology, investment, and expertise.
  2. Create giddy customer references.  Those are hard to come by in BPM, but we’re working on it.
  3. Rely on our superior support team to win over our customers.

We can’t borrow every page from the WP Engine playbook, but we’re going to take as many notes as we can and adapt these ideas to our market.  We’re already starting to see results.

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