Know Your Audience by

Bruce Cleveland didn’t write his article about BPM per se, but he might as well have. His advice sounds like it is right out of the playbook of a BPM software firm or a BPM consulting firm:
Most of the people who sit in these approval roles are measured by and interested in key operational results of the business. Consequently, I believe there are 3 features every business application should contain:
  • The ability for key executives- or their staff – to set thresholds within your application that they consider to be KPIs (key performance indicators) and to have the application automatically notify them via email when those thresholds are met/unmet and the reasons why.
  • The ability to deliver graphs/charts that can be easily configured to identify and highlight critical elements of the business that your application helps operationalize.
  • Usage reports that can be delivered periodically that  include user login statistics along with key operational results.
KPIs and statistics and charts are the sweet spot for BPM.  And yet many BPM projects fail to deliver these on time and on budget because they get distracted by features to support the average user – or more esoteric features for executives, rather than these core capabilities. Bruce continues:
If you want supporting evidence of what I’m talking about, pick any start up and go to their website. While you are there, I am confident you will see comprehensive product feature overviews and use cases, etc. for daily practitioners. However, seldom will you find any discussion regarding product features for senior executives and/or material for the daily practitioner to “sell” their upper management on why they need your application.
Replace “startup” with “project” and “website” with “wiki” and you get an idea of how this might apply to our BPM brethren.