Whose Cloud is it?

Scott Francis
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Interesting review from John Reynolds, of the Kindle Fire.  He’s underwhelmed mainly by the form factor, and the lack of access to non-Amazon content. People often criticize Apple as having a “walled garden” – but if you read the following from John, and you use Apple products, the difference is obvious:
The Kindle Fire experience doesn’t feel like you’re connecting to the web – it feels like you’re looking through a keyhole into one little room of the web… or perhaps you’re trapped in a hallway with many doors and many keyholes.  Many of the keyholes are blocked. That’s when it hit me… Amazon isn’t giving me access to ‘The Cloud’, they’re giving me access to ‘Their Cloud’.  Everything that I purchase from them resides in ‘Their Cloud’.  The same is true for Apple. The stuff I buy from Apple ends up in the ‘Apple Cloud’…  Flash forward in time and I see myself carrying both an iPad and a Kindle, juggling them from one hand to another in order to access ‘My Content’ in ‘Their Clouds’.
Actually, the same isn’t true for Apple, though I can see why he said that. Apple’s iTunes content seems to be locked to iTunes… but it isn’t.  As much of Apple’s content that they can make DRM-free has been made so – only the studio labels stand in the way of DRM-free content.  From my iPhone and iPad I can access gmail, google docs, netflix, amazon’s store, Kindle content, etc. (In fact, I don’t own a Kindle, but read Kindle books on my iPhone and iPad all the time).  The addition of “iCloud” added features and functionality to my use of Apple’s devices, but didn’t remove any.  My iPhone config can now be backed up to the cloud.  Contacts, email, calendar invites now synchronize better between devices. But I also still synch those items with Google Apps. Having said that, I like John’s vision for “MyCloud” even better than what Apple, Google, Amazon, or anyone else is yet producing:
If the Universe was fair, which it isn’t, whenever I created any content it would be stored in ‘My Cloud’.  Whenever I purchased anything it would be stored in ‘My Cloud’.  Facebook, Google+, Apple, and Amazon would have to pull that content from ‘My Cloud’ to use it in their apps, and I would set the policies regarding access to ‘My Content’.
From what John is observing, it sounds to me like Amazon has produced an “Amazon tablet” not a general purpose tablet.  There’s nothing wrong with that, per se… but I don’t think that that’s what people were expecting when they pre-ordered. It isn’t hard to think about the analogies applicable to cloud BPM offerings…