ebizQ Podcast with Anatoly

Scott Francis
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Anatoly recently did a podcast with ebizQ’s Peter Schoof.  The transcript was posted on Anatoly’s blog, and well worth reading, but something he said in the pre-amble really caught my attention:
My activities in BPMN got me a reputation of an expert in process modeling. Let it be so; yet I believe it’s rather the basics of the craft than its top and personally I’m more interested in issues arising at BPM and performance consulting intersection and business process BPMS implementation methodology. It’s a common story: the public is more attracted to what an expert considers almost trivial while what he treats as an achievement may come unnoticed. As an example, the most popular posts at this blog are those tagged “FAQ”.
I added the emphasis in the second sentence, and included the whole paragraph for context.  One of the most difficult things to explain to novices and newcomers to BPM is that although the basics sound easy in black and white, a lot of judgment and experience comes to bear in making subjectively good decisions about how to leverage BPM techniques.  Rightly, this is not what people want to hear.  They want to hear that it is a science, an engineering discipline, if not a mathematical formula.  But it is not so. I’ve often said what makes the difference between the average BPM practitioner and a really good one is that the best practitioners have a sense for how all the individual simple things will come together into a cohesive outcome – each individual action being pretty easy, but the combination of actions, and knowing which action to execute when, and under what circumstances-  that is the secret sauce of BPM. What Anatoly’s blog largely provides is an insight into how he thinks through these basics – the subtleties that are like lego bricks – individually sort of simple (2×4, 2×2, etc. ) but in combination quite interesting business problems can be addressed. And it is the basics you need to master first.    

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