A Year in Blogging: 2010

Scott Francis
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Looking back at our year in blogging, I thought some of the statistics were interesting to share, as they reflect what our readers are thinking about. First, which posts were most popular in 2010?  Reading the list, it is a pretty good reflection of the themes of 2010:  Industry consolidation (IBM’s purchase of Lombardi, and Progress’ purchase of Savvion), open source BPM (activiti), the need for services (skills – Pure Play BPM firms), the rise of social BPM, and innovation in the BPM space (in spite of the acquisitions).  It was surprising to me is that the BPMN vs. BPEL article still gets so many views – this is a debate that is well over for most of us in the BPM space.
  1. Will Open Source Software Meet the Challenge? Activiti Enters the Ring
  2. #IBMImpact: IBM’s Vision for the Future of Lombardi (and BPM)
  3. And Savvion goes to Progress #BPM
  4. Why We Need Pure Play BPM Consulting Firms
  5. BPMN vs BPEL round 15
  6. The Rise of “Social” BPM Tools
  7. Innovation in BPM is Alive and Well
The other surprising element was how quickly the Activiti post jumped to the top of the list for the year (and stayed there), with about a 20% advantage over the #2 post.  There are a lot of people following Activiti.  Interestingly, despite numerous posts and discussions on the subject, ACM-related posts didn’t crack the top 10. What else changed in 2010?  Well, if you look at top referrers, in 2009, Google Reader was #1.  In 2010, Twitter jumps to the top of the list (nearly 3:1 ratio over Google Reader). RSS may not be dead, but it has real competition in Twitter.
  1. twitter.com
  2. google.com/reader/view
  3. bp-3.com
  4. twitter.com/sfrancisatx (hey, there must be a few people following my links on twitter)
  5. activiti.org – this partly explains the high ranking of our first post on Activiti.
What about search terms?  Again, I was surprised that BPMN vs. BPEL leads the list!  Second was a direct query for the bp3 blog:
  1. bpmn vs bpel
  2. bp3 blog
  3. social bpm
  4. bpm framework
  5. google wave gravity
  6. gravity google wave
  7. bpel vs bpmn
Not sure if the conclusion should be that people are still too focused on researching technical standards, or if we simply write too much about them on our blog! Overall, our typical monthly traffic has grown from ~2000 unique views per month to over 3000 unique views per month.  A modest number of views, for sure, but we’re happy to be contributing to the BPM community and fostering some lively discussion on our own blog as well as others!

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