Keith Swenson Takes Questions on Social BPM

Scott Francis
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Keith has an excellent post in the form of a Q&A session, as a followup to an ebizQ recorded session that didn’t have time to address all the questions that came in. Some choice quotes:
The knowledge worker supporting “planning by doing” approach is less about up front definitions of a process.  In general it seems to me that rule sets are primarily useful in order to clearly specify an automated response, and must be prepared ahead of time.  It is hard to see how you would use such rules when directly performing the work.
I can imagine someone defining fairly trivial rules – such as requiring approval above a certain $ threshold after delegating some work to someone else, and deciding that “on the fly”.  But as he says, “in general” the whole point of rules is to address rules at design time, rather than on the fly at run-time (other than by executing the rule)…
4. HOW DOES THE CONCEPT OF A SERVICE ORIENTED BUSINESS APPLICATION(SOBA) RELATED TO SOCIAL BPM, IF AT ALL? SOA is an orthogonal concept to BPM in general — although there is a widespread misunderstanding about them being similar or the same thing.
Agreed. Q&A #7 was particularly well-done, as it relates to something Keith has been thinking or writing about a lot lately – unpredictable work and how to track it or measure it – too long to quote here, but please link over to Keith’s page and read it.  He breaks down at least 4 approaches to tracking unpredictable work for the purpose of better understanding it and improving it. Keith has one more anecdote I had to quote because it is mind-boggling in hindsight:
I remember a friend who was at a company that was acquired by Computer Associates in the 1990′s.  At that time, CA ran an email system, but they allowed access to it only at lunchtime and after hours.  You see, nobody was allowed to access email “during working hours”.
Well, I think it is safe to say that “social” is facing some of the same challenges in the workplace today.  But 15-20 years from now people will look back and wonder that companies weren’t more encouraging of tools like Twitter and others to get work done.