iPhone in the Enterprise by

A new article from TBIResearch concludes that employees are driving iPhone adoption in the enterprise.  This fits the anecdotal observations I’ve made about my own friends – that those who can choose, are largely choosing iPhones, and those who can’t, are largely using Blackberries.  Very few of my colleagues don’t have “smart phones” at this point. TBI Research points out that this trend is important for Apple because the enterprise market is, so far, lightly penetrated by Apple and represents a huge market for their phones.  Often the “employees” driving the trend are executives that can force IT’s hand in supporting the phones. TBI points out that the largest remaining barrier is Security.  Trumping that, in my opinion, is the utility of the iPhone and the many applications available.  If I were an industry analyst, I would tell you that there will be BPM apps available on the iPhone in 2010 (0.9 probability). To further support that perspective, there are now reports that Apple will ship a CDMA compatible phone in late 2010.  The article makes some great arguments why Apple should be pursuing CDMA compatibility – primarily, its cheap, and it would enable them to compete for Verizon’s large customer base.
  • Pingback: Tweets that mention Process for the Enterprise » Blog Archive » iPhone in the Enterprise -- Topsy.com()

  • http://www.bouncingthoughts.com/ Jaisundar

    Your observations are inline with what I have seen on many non-BPM products as well. Extensions of certain types of activities to non-conventional delivery channels like email (not anymore non-conventional really :) ) and mobile phones has helped avoid holding up of processes. I have come across situations where Text messages have been successfully used in applications relating to customer service (issue notifications, closing calls, ordering parts etc)

    When it comes to BPM, since we are aiming at efficiency and TATs and not just automation, these non-conventional channels will be a natural extension and the need to exploit these will be much more than we have seen in other tools. I think gadgets and their capabilities have also been evolving a lot and the coming year is sure going to be exciting for BPM.

    So 0.9 probability looks agreeable to me and I would bet on your prediction!

  • http://www.bouncingthoughts.com Jaisundar

    Your observations are inline with what I have seen on many non-BPM products as well. Extensions of certain types of activities to non-conventional delivery channels like email (not anymore non-conventional really :) ) and mobile phones has helped avoid holding up of processes. I have come across situations where Text messages have been successfully used in applications relating to customer service (issue notifications, closing calls, ordering parts etc)

    When it comes to BPM, since we are aiming at efficiency and TATs and not just automation, these non-conventional channels will be a natural extension and the need to exploit these will be much more than we have seen in other tools. I think gadgets and their capabilities have also been evolving a lot and the coming year is sure going to be exciting for BPM.

    So 0.9 probability looks agreeable to me and I would bet on your prediction!

  • http://www.bp-3.com/ Scott Francis

    Agreed, these non-conventional channels are getting more powerful and therefore more useful to processes. Not all of the “process” applications will be BPM applications, but the impact on business process and business generally will be profound.

  • http://www.bp-3.com Scott Francis

    Agreed, these non-conventional channels are getting more powerful and therefore more useful to processes. Not all of the “process” applications will be BPM applications, but the impact on business process and business generally will be profound.