More on Building the Team

Scott Francis
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Every once in a while you see a blog post or article that really rings true, as this one did, by Trent Hamm. The thesis of the article is that more money is not more happiness for your employees.  And especially when more money shows up as a proposed antidote to an existing dissatisfaction with the job. Many years ago one of my former bosses put it this way – “Right now you’re not happy with your job.  If they give you a raise tomorrow, how are you going to feel about your job 3 months from now?  Is anything else going to change?” It really sent me back to the drawing board to think about the job I wanted, and not just the financial package I thought “made the job worth it.”  And it started me down the path of realizing that there was more to my career to manage than just the financial returns. Over the years, managing my own teams, and acting as a sounding board or adviser to those managing their own teams, I’ve observed that usually when you have a problem that you or your team member thinks can be addressed with more money, you’ve already missed the opportunity to excite this person about your team, your mission, and the opportunity in front of them.  As an employer, if you are going to throw more money at the personnel problem, make sure that isn’t the only thing you do – invest in the person, invest in improving their work situation. What we do at BP3 isn’t easy – traveling to our customers’ locations to advise them on their processes and to implement those processes in a BPMS package.  So maybe that makes us even more aware that we need to invest in the intellectual, personal, and professional well-being of our teammates.  We’re not always going to be successful retaining our team members, but we like to think that we appreciate them while they’re with us, and we’re thankful for their contributions in building BP3 into the company we can be in the future.  Hopefully that appreciation is equally apparent to our team members and our customers.