The Brand Builds Itself

Scott Francis
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Thanks to Michelle Greer, I found this post on Gaping Void about the using blogs to create a “global micro-business”.  The whole post is a great read about how a tailor in England used a blog to transform and improve his business. The best part, of course, is that it didn’t require changing the product being offered.  It just meant spending the time to communicate the passion for the business that the owner had, which would generate additional interest in the value of the product he was selling. The author makes a couple of great points about why this strategy worked. My favorites, which I believe apply to BP3:
  1. A great product.  This really was one of the best tailors in the world.  Similarly, we really believe BP3 is as good as it gets for delivering BPM solutions (service rather than product).
  2. Focus.  The tailor kept at it, and kept his blog focused on suits (not breakfast).  When our blog strays from the main topic (process), or our own business (BP3), we’ll try to keep it focused on topics that relate to process, but possibly in different ways than people might usually imagine (e.g. startups, Apple, etc).
  3. Continuity – The tailor had it.  We have it too.  We’ve been doing BPM as long as anyone, and we’re focused like a laser on our space.
  4. “We don’t have to create the brand out of thin air. We just tell the truth and the brand builds itself.”  I feel the same way about BP3.  We don’t have to come up with a great marketing pitch – our actual project stories are plenty good enough.
So, with that said, we’re going to keep focused on building BPM success with customers, one project, one program, one customer at a time.  We think the “brand” will take care of itself.