Financial Results in BPM

Scott Francis
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Looks like BPM companies are starting to crow about their growth and reveue prospects.  Savvion announced that it won every competitive deal they were in, Appian announced the best first half in their history, and Pega announced 1Q earnings of $9M, though they havent (yet) announced Q2. However, outside of Pega, who of course is publicly traded, the results lack enough meat on the bone.  If Savvion won every competitive deal they were in, and Pega‘s license revenue was up 60%, then that statistic tells me that Savvion is missing a lot of deals (maybe north of $50M worth).  Appian quotes statistics about customer acquisition and “new orders” but leaves us wondering how that turns into revenue – ie, if orders are up 67%, does that mean that Revenue is up a similar amount?  bookings?  or did the ASP (Average Selling Price) decline?  Can’t tell.  Further muddying things is the fact that Pega doesn’t break out any of its non-BPM revenue from its BPM revenue. I haven’t seen Q2 or 1H announcements from Lombardi or Intalio yet – but if I missed them please chime in here and help me out! UPDATE: Pega’s Q2 results came out, and it reported 25% increase in revenue from Q2 2008 to Q2 2009.  Pega’s CEO reports that they are growing faster than “the market” though I’m not sure if he means the software market or the BPM market in particular. 25% growth is a pretty good result in the 2009 economy. UPDATE (8/25/2009): Lombardi issued a press release on its 1H2009 results.  In the press release, Lombardi reports double-digit growth (though 10-99% is quite a range), and it also reports being profitable and adding to its cash reserves.  Lombardi goes on to tout its historic growth rate, market share gains, analyst reviews, product releases, etc.
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  • Good comments in the above blog post – fair questions being raised:
    – is renewed buzz around BPM translating into increased revenue for BPMS vendors or just translating into a “less-bad” market space than other software arenas?

    And will the buzz flatline when the economy improves? or will sales accelerate?

  • Good comments in the above blog post – fair questions being raised:
    – is renewed buzz around BPM translating into increased revenue for BPMS vendors or just translating into a “less-bad” market space than other software arenas?

    And will the buzz flatline when the economy improves? or will sales accelerate?

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