Intalio Crows about New Offerings

Scott Francis
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Intalio’s Ismael Ghalimi is crowing about some new offerings that are at least partly as a result of some acquisitions they’ve done recently.  The press release announces the new branding that is prevalent on their website.  They are now advertising themselves as the “Enterprise Cloud Company”, and essentially trying to ride the coattails of two big buzzwords- BPM and Cloud.  This isn’t that different than what some other companies are doing, though it may be a bit more aggressive on the branding side than those other efforts.  I’m not sure that I follow the strategy of moving into the CRM space (which, as anyone following that space knows, has a couple of strong competitors in Salesforce, SugarCRM, and Oracle/Siebel, among others). And it also concerns me when I read a press release that quotes an anonymous customer from “one of the World’s largest banks” – its hard to get attributed quotes from customers in time to hit press release or marketing deadlines – but that is precisely why they are so valuable.  Anyone who knows how hard it is to get them understands that you have to actually be delivering value for the customer to even have a hope of getting such a recommendation. We’ll have to see how the acquisitions shake out for Intalio, but none of this sounds like bad news for the BPM space.   Its a very ambitious play for Intalio.  On this page, Intalio announces its utility pricing for on-premise solutions.  Again, they’re painting a pretty ambitious picture for what they’ll set up, including VMWare vSphere as the hypervisor.  The pricing at first glance looks a little high to me- but that is based on my thumbnail cost+ consideration, rather than comparing to what other solutions cost when priced the same way (at $10/GB of memory, paying $0.10/hour/GB means that you’re paying $10 for 100 hours of 1 GB, and you keep paying going forward). UPDATE: In another page, Intalio rolls out their new slogan and messaging, answering my question above as to “why enter the CRM market?” to some degree- they’ve given their view of the value-play in that space, but haven’t fully explained the rationale behind their move into the space from a strategic point of view.  The three limits Intalio targets:
  1. Deployment options – Intalio offers their CRM package on-demand, on-premises, and managed on-premises.
  2. Programming language (for customization and custom extensions) – Intalio claims Salesforce only supports APEX and Visualforce, while Intalio supports a number of standard languages.
  3. Capacity and Performance – Intalio appears to be offering bigger file sizes, etc. than Salesforce.
Again, interesting stuff from Intalio, and aggressive positioning.  I’m curious to see how it plays in the marketplace, and definitely interested in reading any comments, emails, or posts from folks who are using the Intalio cloud offering!

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