Happy New Year

Scott Francis
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Here it is, New Year’s Eve, 2008.  Like most of us, my thoughts turn reflective on the past year:  where we started, what we’ve achieved, and what we hope to do in the new year. In 2008, we grew our staffed headcount 350%.  We don’t expect to repeat that trajectory in 2009, but we do hope to grow our ability to staff our team by 50%.  We hired some of the best and brightest when it comes to implementing BPM software solutions, and we now have the core team of experienced veterans to build around. We rolled out a lot of processes for our customers in 2009. In all, we had significant impact on 15 processes.  We had 10 production roll-outs of major processes and major revisions to processes.  We had 3 processes go to production in which we assisted as mentors to the project team.  We had 2 processes complete development with production deployment scheduled for 2009.  Several of these projects were with insurance and financial services companies that are weathering the difficult economic climate quite well.  I think we’ve shown that BP3 is a fantastic partner when customers really want to get projects and processes into production, and off of the whiteboard. We defined our services framework, which shapes how we think BPM offerings should work in general. We developed and delivered our Lean 6 / BPM for IT Training class, in partnership with SixSigmaUS (If you’re interested in the class, please click on the Six Sigma link to request a spot in the next open enrollment class or to request a private class for your organization).  This is the beginning of converting the knowledge in our collective heads into teachable content for a larger audience. BP3 had the honor of contributing to the OMG Certification of Expertise in BPM (OCEB) Examinations as well, which help set the standard for BPM knowledge and expertise in the industry, and really help define what exactly “BPM” is in the first place. BP3 also participated in several conferences this year, that definitely enlightened us:  the Lombardi User Conference in Austin (Driven 2008), the Appian conference in DC, followed by the Gartner BPM Summit, and finally the OMG Think Tank meeting in Chicago. We had speaking or moderating roles in all of these, with the exception of Appian’s conference. Most of all, we had the pleasure of working with some very forward-thinking customers who are striving to help their companies succeed through more efficient processes with better customer service. We had a very full plate in 2008.  And with cautious optimism, we look to a bright 2009.  What do we have planned? Expanding our implementation team. We’ll be growing our team opportunistically this year, as we continue to find great professionals and great customers to work with. More education opportunities. We’re going to continue to offer our Lean-Six for IT training offering. More process consulting. We’re going to leverage our expertise applying Lean-Six to white-collar processes and grow this part of our business in 2009. More software. We have some ideas in mind on the software front, to augment our consulting practice with useful tools of the trade. More evangelism for BPM. Expect to see us at a few of the conferences again this year.  We believe in the power of BPM to improve your business, and we’re going to be on the road talking about it.  And we’ll be right here, on the blog. Happy New Year, and all the best to our customers, partners, and friends in 2009!

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  • I want to add that when we talk about Lean-Six in white collar processes, we are talking about an integrated BPM approach where this is “a” method of use and depending on the circumstances, factored based on the process maturity/capability of the company engaging us; pragmatism will rule.

  • I want to add that when we talk about Lean-Six in white collar processes, we are talking about an integrated BPM approach where this is “a” method of use and depending on the circumstances, factored based on the process maturity/capability of the company engaging us; pragmatism will rule.